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Facing Storms and Life

September 10, 2011

Yesterday, I stacked firewood, a chore on my to-do list that I wanted to complete along with washing the westerly windows and patio furniture. It felt good to scribble a line through these tasks written on scrap paper, to look at the finished work with satisfaction.

I hadn’t listened to the weather report for the last couple of days and had no idea that a storm was coming. Wind, thunder and enough showers to wet the earth arrived late yesterday. The hens’ premature molting (which usually starts in November) cautioned me of an early, wet winter. But, hay, what happened to fall?

I don’t like winter. It’s dark, dull, uncomfortable, and hazardous.

Hazardous indeed! Little did I know this peewee storm, which felt like humid Hawaii days, would surge through the house and damage my main computer. The computer given to me by my son. It’s as old as the computer I’m typing on but POWERFUL. Photos upload from my camera in a snap and there’s lots of computer space for all that I need to do. I can have more than one program open. I can have dual monitors (the one I’m looking at and the one my son gave to me). I had planned to backup my files this weekend. Did you catch the words ‘planned to’ ‘this weekend’?

All my work could be lost.

The moment my stomach begins to turn and I feel stressed over a computer, years of work, I stop myself. It would be easy to cry, to wail boohoo. This isn’t fair. For over a year, I’ve been trying to save enough funds to get DSL so I don’t have to spend hours uploading photos and posts. So I won’t tie up the landline. So I don’t have to limit my online research to midnight sessions. So I can download software programs needed to create and sale eBooks. So I can upload images to sell online.

I’ve also been trying to raise enough funds to buy a professional camera so I can produce images larger than 5×7. I’m trying to save funds to build a demo garden so I can hold workshops. But paychecks are hit and miss. Benefits are lost. The tractor died—a cracked head. I lost my prescription glasses. My car is wheeling around on three worn tires and one spare.

These challenges (and more) are real. But they are minor issues in a world of hurting people who have lost far, far more. Although the plans and dreams I’ve been trying to carry out for over a year get stuck in one mud puddle after another, I am happy. I am grateful for what I can and do accomplish. For what I do have.

For those of you who have encouraged me and continue to hang out at In and Around the Garden. For my guest writers!

For Ralphie who loves me without question. My children and their families are priceless. Moreover, I am the sweetheart (according to Joe) of a man who chooses to put up with me year after year. Like the peewee storm, the mud puddles in my path will dry up. Someday. I have faith.

Taking a moment to remember those who lost their lives a decade ago tomorrow.

Taking a moment to remember our soldiers and their families.

Taking a moment to remember the jobless, the homeless victims of the economy.

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One comment

  1. In every life some rain may fall, but the benifits of a cloudy day can produce a beautiful bouquet and you have helped us see the beauty in that. Thank you Dianne.

    Like



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