Posts Tagged ‘Horticulture’

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Bounty Hunting for Plants with Bling

December 10, 2013

dogwoodWhen it comes to selecting new plants, a great fervor burns in me for color and texture, and for the uncommon species. The vibrancy of bright blooms and variegated foliage is what brings a garden or patio—and one’s emotions—to life.

Unlike commonplace shrubs, nurseries usually stock plants with bling in small quantities making them a quick sellout and the hunt challenging.

This year, during a pursuit I captured a variegated, red twig dogwood (Cornaceae). Spring through summer the leaves are bright green edged in cream. Come fall they turn variegated pink. The leaves have fallen now. This exposes the beautiful, smooth red twigs–a showstopper when the plant is larger.

While in its dormant state, I transplanted the dogwood from the black nursery pot to a larger, clay pot. Then I did a little pruning to keep the dogwood from becoming straggly.

First, I removed a few deadwood, cross or crowded branches. If my dogwood had suckers at the base I would have cut them off, but only if I did not want it to spread like a shrub.

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Next, I pruned branches growing beyond the dogwood’s natural shape. The trick is to not over prune. This reduces foliage and possibly the yellowish-white spring flowers.

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Last, I went through the trimmings and chose those with a node near one end of the twigs and placed them in the same pot to propagate.

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With proper care, my dogwood will bring life to the back patio and evoke garden bling year round.

Here’s the rap sheet on variegated, red twig dogwood.

Zones vary by species

Deciduous

Blooms April

Full Sun/Partial Shade

Max Height:  6-8′

Max Width:  4-6′

Water well in any soil type

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Bulbs and Weeds

March 7, 2012

Here are two garden reminders that will keep your fingers in the soil, your body fit, and your yard the envy of every neighbor.

For summer color spots and cut flowers, plant bulbs as soon as the ground isn’t too wet or frozen. Buy now to get cream of the crop bulbs. Select bulbs that are firm, not soft. The most common summer-blooming bulbs include lilies, tuberous begonias, dahlias, and gladiolus. For beautiful mixed bouquets throughout the summer months, plant each variety every seven to fourteen days.

 Just what you’ve been waiting all winter to do!

 

“Gardening requires lots of water – most of it in the form of perspiration.” –Lou Erickson

 

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