Posts Tagged ‘succulents’

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The Upside during Hard Times

July 25, 2016

A lot happened after the last post from guest writer Heidi Gaul. Those challenging times are over, I hope. Since I am practicing “no complaining” I’ll share the upside of gardening during the past weeks.

When I visited a dear friend in Shenandoah Valley, I took three photographs. Usually, when I’m in a beautiful garden, like my friend’s, I can’t stop taking pictures. But we don’t see each other often and she is such a lovely person, that I wanted to spend the short visit with her.

Bonnie Toy

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During the past weeks, I managed to stop in at the local garden center, twice, at Lowes. The first time, I didn’t buy anything, but found their large selection of succulents impressive.

 

The second time at Lowes, I bought a flat of annual vinca.

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The flowerbed is small, and has a split personality. Plants love the north half of the bed, but not the south half. Even though I amended the soil, studied the water intake and sun exposure, I lost six or eight vincas. Those remaining are much smaller than the ones in the photo, planted on the north half. I can’t figure out the problem. But I know from past experiences, I’ll find plants that will thrive throughout the flowerbed.

Everything works out, eventually, even in the garden.

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Sunburst

April 24, 2015

 

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Don’t you just love Aeonium Sunbrusts? The variegation naturally brightens any garden, patio, or balcony, and once established it needs occasional watering.

This beautiful photo was provided by Author Nell Foster who has a great article and video on Aeonium Sunbursts. Check them out, and while you are there be sure to read about Nell and her growing business, Joy Us garden.

Thanks for sharing, Nell!

 

 

 

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Live Forever . . .

November 20, 2014

. . . that is the meaning of Sempervivum, more commonly known as hens and chicks. Now, here’s the kicker. The mother hen (or main rosette) lives two to three years, not forever! But she produces so many chicks you’ll always have future generations—thus the reason for naming this succulent Sempervivum.

But don’t be fooled by all the little chicks. This plant is not invasive.

The chicks can be transplanted at any time. When the mother hen dies it is best to divide and replant the chicks close together. This succulent loves to be cozy.

Which one becomes the hen when the chicks are orphaned? I suppose the largest chick, the one that gives birth first!

Click here, to see a photo of the hens and chicks below when I had first planted them.

 

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Chicks

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Zones: 3 – 11

Full – part sun

Well-drained soil, drought tolerant, water when soil dries out.

 

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