Posts Tagged ‘photography’

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The Upside during Hard Times

July 25, 2016

A lot happened after the last post from guest writer Heidi Gaul. Those challenging times are over, I hope. Since I am practicing “no complaining” I’ll share the upside of gardening during the past weeks.

When I visited a dear friend in Shenandoah Valley, I took three photographs. Usually, when I’m in a beautiful garden, like my friend’s, I can’t stop taking pictures. But we don’t see each other often and she is such a lovely person, that I wanted to spend the short visit with her.

Bonnie Toy

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During the past weeks, I managed to stop in at the local garden center, twice, at Lowes. The first time, I didn’t buy anything, but found their large selection of succulents impressive.

 

The second time at Lowes, I bought a flat of annual vinca.

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The flowerbed is small, and has a split personality. Plants love the north half of the bed, but not the south half. Even though I amended the soil, studied the water intake and sun exposure, I lost six or eight vincas. Those remaining are much smaller than the ones in the photo, planted on the north half. I can’t figure out the problem. But I know from past experiences, I’ll find plants that will thrive throughout the flowerbed.

Everything works out, eventually, even in the garden.

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One of the Best Blogging Days

May 8, 2016

One of the best blogging days is when I get to wish all the wonderful Moms around the world

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Happy Mother’s Day.

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Challenge Creates a Beautiful Reveal

April 11, 2016

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Rain was expected through Friday evening, and since I didn’t have the proper material I placed a patio furniture cover over my peony plant. There were over a dozen buds and three blossoms. Too much downpour can cause developing buds to wilt and die, which happened last year.

Peonies are my favorite flower. Waiting and watching the tiny buds mature into stunning saucer-size ruffles is like anticipating a beautiful flower delivery. But keeping my peony under cover too long was a concern. Plants need light and sun, and circulation.

Saturday, it rained all day and into the night. I stood on the front porch and listened to droplets settle on black plastic, concrete, and surrounding plant life. It was a welcome sound in California where the drought is grim. Everything was wet. Water ran from the downspouts. Cottontails, robins, blue jays and doves were tucked out of sight like my peony.

I decided I would uncover the plant on Sunday, even if it was raining. In the morning, I looked outside into the early faint light. The earth was soaked, but the sky had stopped crying.

Gently, I lifted the black plastic and squealed for Iron Man, who was nearby, to come quickly.

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Many of the buds had bloomed beneath the warm cozy cover. Layers of bright white ruffles looked up at us unharmed.

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It was one of those moments when you’re a young girl again and the doorbell rings. You answer and no one’s there, but below is a beautiful bouquet of flowers addressed to you. Just for you.

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The Fever Has Begun

April 1, 2016

If you haven’t had the urge yet to mosey through your local nurseries, the fever should hit you any day now. Where I live, frost is still a possibility so I am looking only at color spots. Here are five beauties that stood out above the other blooms at OSH and Green Acres.

 

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Above and below

Ranunculus: tubers or perennials; all zones; full sun;

1.5 feet tall

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Nemesia: perennials and annuals; zones vary by species;

full sun


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Gerbera Daisies: annual and perennial; zones 10-11;

6-12 inches tall; full sun; part shade in hottest areas


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Dahlia Hypnotica Orange: tuberous-rooted perennials;

all zones; full-part sun; 15-19 inches tall

 

All of the above are suitable for growing in containers.

Do you have a favorite?

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Mustard

March 1, 2016

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“Out of each wintry season

it happens again and again.

That yellow mustardy growth,

a photographer’s gold,

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signals sunny days ahead

over hills and fields and country roads.

A smidgen before spring

it happens again and again.

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Wild and free producing yields,

that warmth, that sunny glow

paints the earth mustardy yellow

where fallow grasses grow.” –016 DMA

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For a fun read on Mustard history and more, check out Eat the Weeds

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Garden Pop Ups

July 27, 2015

Pop Up #1: Remember the Cosmos seedlings that I planted and they did not survive? Well, surprise! The dead annuals kindly sprinkled seeds before I took their little bodies away. I have Cosmos popping up near and far from where the seedlings were planted. This confirms my theory. Cosmos grows better from seed. Here are the first blooms. I am eager for more of these whimsical flowers to explode.

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Pop Up #2: Wow! I did not plant Lysimachia ‘Goldii’ in this location. It must have been the garden fairies who sprinkled seeds from where it is growing. The fairies knew what they were doing. ‘Goldii’ is thriving in this location and I am pleased with the appearance and how it filled in a bare area. DSC00786_edited-1

 

Pop Up #3: This little guy or gal pops up to say hello to anyone approaching our front door. His voice is a little croaky and deep, but he or she is friendly just the same. 

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It’s Sunday, June 21st and I am . . .

June 21, 2015

Father's Day.3

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