Posts Tagged ‘Growing season’

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Garden Tips Hints and Cool Things

March 23, 2012

1) If you are getting ready to sow wildflower seeds, use an empty Parmesan cheese shaker. Fill with a mixture of fine sand and seeds. Then simply shake to spread the seeds as you are planting. The seeds will distribute more evenly. This will also save time.

2) Slugs and snails are coming out. Handpick or place empty 10 to 14oz cans in the ground with the rim at ground level. Fill with beer. The slugs and snails will crawl in for a delicious drink but they won’t get out.

3) Humming birds have arrived, so clean feeders and fill with sugar-water:  One part sugar to four parts water, boiled until dissolved, and completely cooled.

If you have garden tips, hints, or something cool or interesting to share, email them to inthegarden@softcom.net and I will post them along with your name.

Happy Friday!

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Garden Tips Hints and Cool Things

March 2, 2012

A Cool Thing:

Unbelievable! Scientists resurrected this Ice Age plant after 30,000 years in deep freeze.

Tip:

I have added a link listing poisonous plants for livestock and critters living in California,  to the ‘Helpful Resources’ page.

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Last Frost Date and Why it Matters

February 22, 2012

With the onset of spring-like weather, it is tempting to put away frost cloths and to plant vegetation and sow seeds outdoors. But, don’t let the sunshine, green field grasses, and emerging buds fool you. Frost and frozen ground can kill or damage plants and seeds leaving you frustrated, discouraged, and broke.

If you are new to gardening or have recently moved, ask your local Master Gardener Chapter or professional nursery person for your zone’s last frost date. They can also tell you what zone you live in or plug in your zip code here to find out. But remember there is more than one zone system. Guest writer and master gardener Robin Ivanoff explains here.

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Plant Zones: A Simple Explanation

February 6, 2012

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By Master Gardener Robin Ivanoff

“Hey, Baby, what’s your zone?”

No— not a bar pickup line!  This is a question plaguing gardeners every spring when new, tempting plants appear in the local nursery. 

Today, most plants have a convenient grow tag on or in the pot with them that gives specifics about light, water and fertilization.  That same tag usually  tells you the ideal planting zone— but unfortunately, there is more than one zone system that may be referenced on a grow tag.

In California and throughout the West, many nurseries utilize the Sunset climate zone system which divides up the west coast states into many more climate zones than does the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map.

Sunset’s climate zones consider the length of each area’s growing season, total rainfall and seasonal rain timing, winter low and summer high temperatures, plus wind and humidity. 

The USDA plant hardiness zones, recently updated, are based on average annual winter temperatures, organized into 10-degree Fahrenheit zones.

Once you know both your planting zones, you are ready to select some of those juicy new plants you’re considering.  Of course, if you’re still not sure, just ask your nursery plant person to help you select the right plants for your area.  When you know your zones, you’ll have better growing success In And Around The Garden.

Robin writes the ‘Master Gardener Minute’ on HomeTown radio show, KVGC 1340-AM, in Jackson, California. She is host of this educational gardening segment  along with Laura Clark, which airs at various times (and actually last longer than a minute) on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.

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