Posts Tagged ‘annuals’

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Masses around the Oak

March 9, 2016

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A few years ago, I bought one or two Chrysanthemum paludosum. Now I have tenfold. Chrysanthemums are self-sowers, and each year I look forward to a new crop,  late winter – early summer. Last year I decided it would be pretty to have a solid mass growing around the oak tree. (Chrysanthemums are drought tolerant, therefore compatible to the oak.)

When it was time to remove the 12-18-inch annuals, I simply shook the uprooted plants wherever I wanted them to germinate. I actually heard the seeds falling to the ground like wooden rain sticks.

When this year’s crop dries up, I plan to do the same. What fun, and how beautiful it will be to have a solid mass of Chrysanthemums circling the entire oak tree!

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Growing Tips:

USDA Zone 9a – 11

Deer resistant

Great fillers for garden beds, containers, and baskets and as borders

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Bloom Time Depends on Zone and Microclimate:

Late Spring – Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer – Early Fall

Mid Fall

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Garden Pop Ups

July 27, 2015

Pop Up #1: Remember the Cosmos seedlings that I planted and they did not survive? Well, surprise! The dead annuals kindly sprinkled seeds before I took their little bodies away. I have Cosmos popping up near and far from where the seedlings were planted. This confirms my theory. Cosmos grows better from seed. Here are the first blooms. I am eager for more of these whimsical flowers to explode.

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Pop Up #2: Wow! I did not plant Lysimachia ‘Goldii’ in this location. It must have been the garden fairies who sprinkled seeds from where it is growing. The fairies knew what they were doing. ‘Goldii’ is thriving in this location and I am pleased with the appearance and how it filled in a bare area. DSC00786_edited-1

 

Pop Up #3: This little guy or gal pops up to say hello to anyone approaching our front door. His voice is a little croaky and deep, but he or she is friendly just the same. 

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Happy Wednesday!

July 30, 2014

beauty of creation

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No Words Saturday

January 4, 2014

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Soulful Plotting

January 7, 2011

Annual: 

Plants that complete their life cycle in one growing season.

Biennial: 

Plants that live for two years, producing flowers and/or fruit in their second year from seed.

Perennial: 

Plants that live for more than one growing season, three years or more under normal conditions.

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Give and Take

March 26, 2010

Thanks to one of my faithful readers, Betty Lee, I was able to enjoy my favorite garden task . . . planting, which is probably why I slept so well last night.

Like many people, the broken economy has entered my household. I’ve made major cutbacks, including the indulgence of a few annuals. Plans to replace the perennials removed west of the oak tree are on hold. (Read Acorn Blues about this change.) Here’s the miserable thing about doing away with planting . . . I love to plant. I don’t “have” to place anything into the ground or pots. It’s not a necessity, but it is something that gives me a great deal of joy.

Occasionally, I hear about someone who wants to cut back on their yard work and ends up throwing out plants or pots because they can’t find a taker. Therefore, I decided to find a giver. Many of the subscribers, who received In and Around the Garden when it was an e-newsletter, live nearby. Without explanation, I emailed them asking if they had x-large pots (one of mine broke), topsoil, single-trunk dwarf plants, or Japanese Maple trees that they wanted to get rid of, and if so to please contact me.

Betty’s reply gave me hope.

Betty has lived in the same house for 40 years, and tends the lawns, and trees and shrubs all by herself, potting up every little shoot that reseeds from other plants or carried in by birds or wind. The front and back yards are neat and tidy with seasonal color spots. Betty led me through the side yard, and instructed me to grab the upright wheelbarrow leaning against the fence. Following behind her, I pushed it to a southeast corner. I expected a seedling (the wheelbarrow should have been a clue), so imagine my surprise when Betty pointed to a five-foot Japanese Maple tree! The tree was mine—all mine—to take home and plant! It nearly took my breath away. A tree this size would cost $50 to $70! How blessed am I?

Pushing the full wheelbarrow to the car, Betty asked me to stop. She reached down, picked up some pansies, and said these are for you. I was beaming . . . squealing inside . . . grateful to have met up with such a generous lady. Thank you, Betty Lee!

Maybe planting had nothing to do with a good night’s sleep.

Copyright © 2010 Dianne Marie Andre

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March Garden Tasks

March 1, 2010

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Please note:  What I write in this space are lessons learned through trial and error, research, and from other gardeners and professionals. I garden in zone 9, but share garden experiences that I believe are relevant to most zones within a reasonable time frame and planting conditions.

March . . . the bridge between late winter and early spring. This is the time frame when gardeners itch to get his or her hands dirty, and can’t wait to spend spare hours in the garden. For many of us, though, it’s still too early to plant summer annuals and veggies outdoors, but there are plenty of garden tasks and spring plantings to keep us satisfied. Here are a few.

In the vegetable gardenIndoors sow seeds of eggplant, lettuce, peppers, Swiss chard, tomatoes. Outdoors direct-seed beets, carrots, lettuce, peas, radishes, spinach. Transplant your seedlings of broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, lettuce, parsley, and onions. Feed fruit trees, berries, and grapes; check with your local nursery professional for organic fertilizers.

In the landscape:  Use a slow-release fertilizer around shrubs and perennials. Feed rhododendrons when buds emerge and for fuchsias when signs of new leaves appear. Remember to use fertilizer designed especially for these and for azaleas and camellias. Gardenias should receive one feeding starting mid-March, and again in April and May. Apply preventive spray to roses for mildew, rust, and blockspot. Before leafing-out begins transplant shrubs and roses.

Outdoors, sow seeds of columbine, foxglove, poppy, stock, delphinium, violet. Plant gladiolus bulbs every two weeks. Other bulbs are dahlias, cannas, lycoris eucomis, kniphofia, and tuberous begonias. Feed bulbs that have bloomed recently. If your region is free of frost danger, direct-plant pansies, snapdragons, Lobella, and violas. Indoors, sow annuals such as morning glories, Zinnias, asters, marigolds, coleus, vinca, petunia, and impatiens.

If you didn’t cover the soil last fall with mulch, to prevent weeds, you can do this now in areas where you’re not going to plant. Place a thick layer (3-6 inches) so the weeds don’t receive light, which is required for seeds to germinate. Keep mulch 3-6 inches away from base of plants. If too close (or placed against trunks), rot and disease can occur. It’s also an invitation for insects to attack your plants. Organic mulches to consider are non-chemically treated grass clippings, straw, wood chips, shredded leaves.

Copyright © 2010 Dianne Marie Andre

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