Posts Tagged ‘Cosmos’

h1

Seasonal Blogging Farewell

December 3, 2015

Several days ago, my cosmos died then withered into tiny brown specks under a white frost. I hope you photographed your favorite blooms to enjoy during the winter months on your desktop, in a garden journal, video, or framed and hung on a wall.

One benefit of this beautiful annual is the self-sowing seeds, which will provide free flowers, color, texture, and random design around the garden come spring.

Another benefit is the vision I will carry throughout the cold season while I take my usual winter blogging break.

There are lots here, in the archives, to read. Enjoy and leave a comment. I will receive a notice and respond. The photography studio will remain open for orders.

Thank you for subscribing to In and Around the Garden.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! See you in the Spring!

DSC01124_edited-2

DSC01033_edited-1

DSC00977_edited-4

DSC00850_edited-2

Untitled-6_edited-1

 

 

Advertisements
h1

Garden Pop Ups

July 27, 2015

Pop Up #1: Remember the Cosmos seedlings that I planted and they did not survive? Well, surprise! The dead annuals kindly sprinkled seeds before I took their little bodies away. I have Cosmos popping up near and far from where the seedlings were planted. This confirms my theory. Cosmos grows better from seed. Here are the first blooms. I am eager for more of these whimsical flowers to explode.

DSC00813_edited-1

DSC00814_edited-3

DSC00816_edited-2

 

Pop Up #2: Wow! I did not plant Lysimachia ‘Goldii’ in this location. It must have been the garden fairies who sprinkled seeds from where it is growing. The fairies knew what they were doing. ‘Goldii’ is thriving in this location and I am pleased with the appearance and how it filled in a bare area. DSC00786_edited-1

 

Pop Up #3: This little guy or gal pops up to say hello to anyone approaching our front door. His voice is a little croaky and deep, but he or she is friendly just the same. 

DSC00785_edited-1

Untitled-6_edited-1

h1

Spring Bloom Tour

June 9, 2015

Before spring blooms come to an end, here’s a look at some of the flowering plants in my perennial garden.

DSC00644_edited-1

First up is Buddleia, a whimsical deciduous (or evergreen depending on your zone) shrub or tree. I love these because they attract butterflies and humming birds. I have six Buddleias, three in a row on two sides of the garden. Although they serve as an enclosure, I can see through them because of their wispy-like branches.

DSC00642_edited-1

This Hydrangea was a grocery-store gift from hubby. Last fall, I transplanted it from a container to the garden. What a wonderful pop of color these white clusters add to the garden.

DSC00656_edited-1

Cosmos . . . and my only blossom. I planted seedlings in three different locations. Snails loved these and quickly devoured the Cosmos in the bed near the front door. No explanation for losing the others. Perhaps the soil is too rich which the Sunset Western Garden Book says to avoid.

DSC00664_edited-1

Aww, red! Dwarf Callistemon (bottlebrush). I have to admit there are two things I don’t like about this plant. Even though the leaves are tiny, they shed throughout the year and create quite a mess. Also, the blossoms are not self-cleaning and have to be deadheaded.

DSC00662_edited-1

Spiraea is a small deciduous shrub with beautiful flower clusters that also have to be deadheaded. But I enjoy this plant so much, I don’t mind the work. Mine are fifteen years old and only waist high. So there’s no reaching or climbing a ladder when it is time to trim.

DSC00711_edited-1

Tall Verbena (Verbena bonariensis) is my favorite perennial. I LOVE the architectural structure. Little purple clusters sit on thin, six-foot tall stems. The view of neighboring plants isn’t blocked! The stems are so strong no staking is needed. Tall Verbena is difficult to photograph, but in person it is the STAR of the garden. Drought Tolerant. Attracts butterflies.

DSC00650_edited-1

 

That’s the end of the tour. If you’ve been following me for a while, you know there are other spring-flowering plants in my garden (begonias, variegated iris, Santa Barbara Daisies, saliva, snow in summer, and a few more), but I figured you have probably seen enough of those!

I would love to hear what spring blooms you have photographed and which flowers are you favorite?

Oh, I have updated my “About” page. Take a look.

Untitled-6_edited-1

 

%d bloggers like this: