Posts Tagged ‘autumn leaves’

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Time!

November 11, 2015

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I have been trying to find the time to post this photo taken last month. This is the first year the Silver Maples covered the driveway (well, one-quarter, anyway) overnight. Usually the leaves drop slowly which means there are tire tracks. Ralphie wasn’t sure what to think when we took our morning walk.

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Did I mention free time? I had also planned to pick this watermelon. Then splat! It dropped. That was one for the hens.

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Autumn’s Light Series: Photo 3

November 6, 2013

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Author Jon Katz recently blogged, “I think all photographers are obsessive, really, we focus on things and go back to them again and again, time and again.”

Katz words made me feel better about my obsession to stalk the autumn light and capture, digitally, what I see with my eyes. Unfortunately, I fail at seizing the full beauty more than I succeed. The photo here is far from being technically spot-on or professional. But the photo does show the playfulness of autumn’s rays sliding across the southeast pasture behind the tips of silver maple leaves.

When autumn light ebbs through foliage (or window panes) rays move quickly. A photographer has to be on alert, wait and watch. The perfect moment can pass within seconds. As an amateur photographer, sometimes I miss the perfect opportunity because I don’t know or I don’t have the camera settings correct for the situation. Other times, the angle from which I focused the lens, or distance, creates a bad image.

Photography is a lot like gardening. In order to harvest the perfect results, ensuing factors must come together at the right moments. And, so, “all photographers focus on things and go back to them again and again, time and again.”

Photographers (and gardeners) just can’t stop themselves!

Make sure to follow me on facebook.com/inandaroundthegarden

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Overrun with Autumn Leaves

October 5, 2010

Silver maple leaves litter my driveway with golden hues and playful piles, a pretty sight this time of year. The leaves in the perennial garden aren’t as appealing. Brown, dull oak and yellow locust leaves are caught in every inch of every shrub, vine, groundcover, annual, and the soil.

The trees are undressing faster than I have time to gather their discarded clothing. Until last weekend, my rake hadn’t slipped across the beds in weeks. The landscape (and my life) felt unmanageable. I couldn’t stand the unkempt grounds any longer. Another week and the garden would be such a mess a crew would have to be hired. That’s not in my budget. Therefore, I shifted priorities and spent some time in the garden. First on the agenda was the entrance. 

It’s been several years since I first bought my first flat of Chrysanthemums (paludosum) for cool season color. Every year since, when summer’s heat skyrockets, the chrysanthemums dry up and spill seeds like sugar. Then when fall returns the seeds germinate between the flagstones. Once they reach transplanting size, I relocate them. This year there was enough to fill the beds edging the entrance and three areas in the garden. FREE seasonal flowers. I call that nature’s blessings.

Second on the garden agenda, were the leaves, millions-and-millions of leaves. The job of raking (and some trimming) turned into a two-day effort. Fortunately, my husband helped with the bagging. He’s amazing. Then, at the end of the day, wind dispensed its humor across the grounds. Soft laughter blew through the branches and tilting shadows as millions-and-millions of leaves fluttered downward onto my clean garden floor.

The landscape still feels unmanageable. But I feel better for the effort.

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