Posts Tagged ‘Silver maple trees’

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Time!

November 11, 2015

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I have been trying to find the time to post this photo taken last month. This is the first year the Silver Maples covered the driveway (well, one-quarter, anyway) overnight. Usually the leaves drop slowly which means there are tire tracks. Ralphie wasn’t sure what to think when we took our morning walk.

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Did I mention free time? I had also planned to pick this watermelon. Then splat! It dropped. That was one for the hens.

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Autumn’s Light Series: Photo 4

November 12, 2013

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This morning I watched the autumn light

and felt its warmth on my body like a hug and a kiss.

I gawked at the season’s hues,

studied how one color offsets another,

then yearned to travel the world

so I could pocket God’s mysterious creations . . .

the simple and the complicated wonders of nature.

My pockets would be full, no doubt,

and my eagerness with little or no self-control,

for every day I would take out autumn’s light

and hold it in the palm of my hand,

not once, not twice, but more times than I could count.

I would hold spring’s brilliant blossoms,

unbelievable sunsets, weird and strange creatures,

only to marvel and repeat this question,

“How’d you do that God?

How’d you do that?”

–©Dianne Marie Andre 2013

Make sure to follow me on facebook.com/inandaroundthegarden

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Autumn’s Light Series: Photo 3

November 6, 2013

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Author Jon Katz recently blogged, “I think all photographers are obsessive, really, we focus on things and go back to them again and again, time and again.”

Katz words made me feel better about my obsession to stalk the autumn light and capture, digitally, what I see with my eyes. Unfortunately, I fail at seizing the full beauty more than I succeed. The photo here is far from being technically spot-on or professional. But the photo does show the playfulness of autumn’s rays sliding across the southeast pasture behind the tips of silver maple leaves.

When autumn light ebbs through foliage (or window panes) rays move quickly. A photographer has to be on alert, wait and watch. The perfect moment can pass within seconds. As an amateur photographer, sometimes I miss the perfect opportunity because I don’t know or I don’t have the camera settings correct for the situation. Other times, the angle from which I focused the lens, or distance, creates a bad image.

Photography is a lot like gardening. In order to harvest the perfect results, ensuing factors must come together at the right moments. And, so, “all photographers focus on things and go back to them again and again, time and again.”

Photographers (and gardeners) just can’t stop themselves!

Make sure to follow me on facebook.com/inandaroundthegarden

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Slanted Light

October 19, 2011

Where trees grow there are leaves to rake,

Limbs to trim, debris to compost,

And walks to take among slanted light.

Copyright © 2011 Dianne Marie Andre

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Silver Maple Tree (in photo above) Facts:

  • Latin name: Acer saccharinum L.
  • Grows in zones 3 – 9, sun to partial shade.
  • Deciduous. Broad-leafed. Leaves are green on the top and silver underneath.
  • Fast growing with a long lifespan (130 years or more).
  • Thrive in poor soil conditions.
  • Invasive root that easily penetrate poor soil and can break sidewalks and house foundations.

Sun Ray Facts:

  • Sun rays are actually white.
  • As rays travel through the atmosphere, it removes the many blue hues thereby leaving reds, yellows, and oranges. By the time the rays reach human visibility they are processed as yellow. 
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A Beautiful Autumn Day

November 5, 2010

A beautiful autumn day under the silver maple trees (Acer Saccharinum).

Photos were taken yesterday at different times.

 

 

Facts about Silver Maple Trees:

  • Deciduous.
  • Transplants easily.
  • Can live 130 years or more.
  • Ideal for wet bottomland sites.
  • One of the best trees for poor soil.
  • Medium to large fast growing tree.
  • Often used in residential areas for shade.
  • Leaves turn yellowish orange in the fall.
  • Easily recovers from extended periods of flooding.
  • Leaves are deeply cut and silvery white underneath.
  • The wood is soft and can be damaged by severe winds or ice storms.
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