Posts Tagged ‘autumn’

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A Look Into Autumn

September 17, 2014

I am thinking about autumn and what it will bring.

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The obvious is shorter days, longer nights, gentle breezes, and cool temperatures.

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The world will shrink as birds migrate, insects overwinter, and deciduous plants and trees transform from intense hues to bare limbs. Backyard gardeners will plant winter crops or put their beds to rest until spring.

Rest sounds good to me.

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This is the time of year that I want to be lazy, but as it happens every fall, I will be raking acorns and oak leaves through December.

So much for rest . . . the work has just begun.

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Autumn’s Light Series: Photo 5

November 18, 2013
The perfect star to end this series! What delightful images the season’s rays brings to us. All we have to do is look for the magic.
 
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When life takes you on a gallop you despise,
your soul turns cranky and bitter,
and your spirit feels old and weary,
look up into the sky and let your heart
ride the clouds like an angel unafraid to fly.
 
As you glide through the organic firmament,
look down at your earthly home
and all the good in your life,
then laugh at your irrational qualms,
and feel the unpleasant weight subside.
 
Incline your mind, then, your body too,
in a life-walk that causes you to sing a song,
dance under a star, and spend no more time
bound in useless moods or doleful misgivings.
–©Dianne Marie Andre 013
 
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Autumn’s Light Series: Photo 4

November 12, 2013

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This morning I watched the autumn light

and felt its warmth on my body like a hug and a kiss.

I gawked at the season’s hues,

studied how one color offsets another,

then yearned to travel the world

so I could pocket God’s mysterious creations . . .

the simple and the complicated wonders of nature.

My pockets would be full, no doubt,

and my eagerness with little or no self-control,

for every day I would take out autumn’s light

and hold it in the palm of my hand,

not once, not twice, but more times than I could count.

I would hold spring’s brilliant blossoms,

unbelievable sunsets, weird and strange creatures,

only to marvel and repeat this question,

“How’d you do that God?

How’d you do that?”

–©Dianne Marie Andre 2013

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Autumn’s Light Series: Photo 3

November 6, 2013

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Author Jon Katz recently blogged, “I think all photographers are obsessive, really, we focus on things and go back to them again and again, time and again.”

Katz words made me feel better about my obsession to stalk the autumn light and capture, digitally, what I see with my eyes. Unfortunately, I fail at seizing the full beauty more than I succeed. The photo here is far from being technically spot-on or professional. But the photo does show the playfulness of autumn’s rays sliding across the southeast pasture behind the tips of silver maple leaves.

When autumn light ebbs through foliage (or window panes) rays move quickly. A photographer has to be on alert, wait and watch. The perfect moment can pass within seconds. As an amateur photographer, sometimes I miss the perfect opportunity because I don’t know or I don’t have the camera settings correct for the situation. Other times, the angle from which I focused the lens, or distance, creates a bad image.

Photography is a lot like gardening. In order to harvest the perfect results, ensuing factors must come together at the right moments. And, so, “all photographers focus on things and go back to them again and again, time and again.”

Photographers (and gardeners) just can’t stop themselves!

Make sure to follow me on facebook.com/inandaroundthegarden

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Autumn Light

October 31, 2013

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I am fortunate to love gardening and even more so to live in wide open space where the sun can emit beams on rolling hills along landscape foliage. Autumn, second to spring, is the most beautiful time of the year. Some people say autumn is the finale of things present and past, but for me autumn is about new beginnings when I can shed old and tired layers, make plans for rest, gather renewed strength, and reserve stories for coffee shop friends on wintry days and with family during holiday meals.

The autumn sun never fails to appease me as I comb the grounds for desirable light connecting with agreeable vegetation. There is something calming about autumn foliage made brighter by rays. I am fortunate to walk among this short-seasoned phase, to look for the autumn sunlight and to capture it, if I can. Sunlight is the most natural and pleasant thing in the world to receive.

(This is Photo 1 in what I hope a series of Autumn’s Light)

Happy Halloween!

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Change: It’s happens, but I don’t have to like it.

August 24, 2011

This year, spring through summer, many changes have occurred throughout the seasons. One major, uninvited, alternation on our country property where we live was the removal of four beautiful trees. Now, at the threshold of autumn, the open rolling hills along our northern pasture are about to transform. The neighbors are putting in a vineyard.

In the following days and weeks, huge equipment will rip through the land. Dust will hover like low, lingering fog. Field workers will come and go. Parked cars will sit on the shoulders of our PRIVATE dead-end road. Voices and perhaps a little singing or whistling will drift over the foothills and into the valleys. After the plantings and later when the vines have grown, chemicals will contaminate the air, the land, and most likely on the volunteer oats where our beef cattle graze.

I know what to expect. Clements Vineyard is a few feet east of our property. During harvest season picking machines HOWL in the middle of the night. We don’t sleep. Yellow slow-moving headlights glow like dinosaur eyes and spook Ralphie. He runs from window to window barking repeatedly. I tell him, “It’s only headlights, Ralphie. Go to sleep.” Like a comedy portraying poor communication between characters, he doesn’t listen.

Staged for change at autumn’s oncoming approach, man is capsulizing my world into metamorphosis. I’m beginning to feel small, sandwiched in . . . overrun via alterations. Sooner or later I will adjust. So will Ralphie. Like my husband said, “It wouldn’t bother us if we were putting in the vineyard.” © 2011 Dianne Marie Andre

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