Posts Tagged ‘poetry’

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The Alarm of Summer’s End

August 25, 2014

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 I stood amongst the potted garden

delighted with summer’s hues and scents,

when overhead the sound of honking geese astonished me.

To my surprise, the alarm of summer’s end had arrived.

 

In the coming weeks, from time to time,

I will watch the crimson sunset with my love,

recall the season’s nights and days,

the work, the play, the rest,

then question which of these had we done the best

and which should we have done the least?

 

I will most likely sigh, the long slow sigh

that signals it is time to prepare my soul

for the passing of time,

the pulling back of dead blossoms and faded dreams,

the unfinished feats I pledged to self,

to others, and my love.

 

But I will ponder on these for a moment only,

then praise my love’s encouragement

for booming hues in tubs of clay,

where we will sit next year once again,

delighted in summer’s potted garden.

  © 2014 Dianne Marie Andre

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Harvesting Hardballs

August 6, 2014

Fruit Vegetable Gallery #3:

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Driving along a country road,

I spied a watermelon stand.

I pulled to the side

and watched the workers in the field

where hundreds of watermelons

lounged in one long row.

The field hands,

bent and bowed, hot and sweaty,

had picked the heaviest,

ripest watermelons

and lined them up at the edge of a dirt road.

One by one, they tossed the hardballs,

assembly line style, into an old yellow bus.

The workers sang a lively song,

I imagined to keep the rhythm going,

and their spirits lifted.

I exited my car, picked out a watermelon,

then paid the nice lady in the stand.

Smiling, I left with a mighty fine treat

and harvest music chanting in my ears.

© Dianne Marie Andre

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For Ten Facts You Never Knew About Watermelon, click http://www.thetowndish.com/2007/06/07/ten-facts-you-never-knew-about-watermelon/

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Naked Lady

July 28, 2014

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In leafless form, the Naked Lady stands bold and strong.

She is not ashamed of her physical difference,

Nor of her inability to copycat peers.

She trusts the music of nature each day brings,

And waits for honey bees to kiss the heart of her soul,

The mystery from which delicious gold is made.

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The Naked Lady loves her work

and her individuality.

She is not ashamed of her leafless form.

She knows her purpose,

To bring a revival of wonder that life is a miracle,

Not only in the things of the earth, but of the soul.

© 2014 Dianne Marie Andre

 

Naked Lady:

Common Name: Resurrection Lily, Naked Lady

Botanical Name: Lycoris squamigera (ly-KO-ris squam-IG-er-a)

Blooms: 7-11 days.

Growth: Bulb. Linear leaves appear from the bulb in spring then die back. Leafless stock emerges up to 30 inches high. Flowers bloom mid-late July. Hardy, easy to grow.

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When I wake

February 23, 2014

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The slow morning sun appears to lift up a dark gloomy sky.

I see a cross in the distant land, a dim image of the sacrificial lamb,

a sign of good times and of great days to come.

I watch the cross.

I imagine the earth rotating silently around the sun.

When all is revealed, supportive lines come into view.

Communication is open through prayerful hearts and man-made wires,

both linked day and night to a symbolic wooden cross.

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No Words Sunday | Time to Rest

February 2, 2014

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Leaves, Leaves, And More Leaves: Part II

January 22, 2014

The rumbling mower zipped over the leaves and snatched them up with metal blades.

Dirt flew out; dust swirled around and glazed my face a coat of grubby brown.

This isn’t going to work, I said with a huff, a cough, and fluttered eyelids.

But I persisted on giving it a try, on completing the task at hand.

When the bag was full, I turned off the mower, removed the bag, and peered inside through raccoon eyes.

No surprise. It didn’t work. The leaves were whole, not broken down for swift decay.

I sighed then looked around at all the leaves, one trillion to be exact.

I should have known the old way is best:  A good rake and large leaf bags.

It beats the roar of a mower, dust swirls, and raccoon eyes.

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Note:  All fun aside, it is possible to break down leaves with a mower, but you’ll have to run over them at least twice. (I didn’t have the patience to do this—too much dust.) Be sure to wear goggles and a face mask. You can try a chipper.

I DO recommend using broken-down leaves as mulch. It’s free. It’s good for the soil and mulching is especially important now that we are in a severe drought.

Since I have decided to pass on the dusty task, I will be adding four inches of commercial mulch where needed.  I am placing the oak leaves in the pasture along the outside of the garden fence to control the weeds.


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No Words Sunday

January 19, 2014

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